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View Full Version : Building that we will use on MARS



Tovo
04-23-2013, 05:22 PM
Now there is something on my mind that make me curious for something.

What building that we live on MARS with?

I Want to know what shape are they and how big is it.

Astro
04-23-2013, 05:27 PM
You can visit here to look at the beautiful concept art for the Mars One project: http://www.spacehabs.com/424528/mars-one/ (There are some great new additions for those who have been previously interested :) )

With more information available at the official Mars One website: http://mars-one.com/en/mission/technology

Hope this helps :)

Tovo
04-23-2013, 05:33 PM
Wow Thanks That surely help me.
I'm hope that i can live in one of that buildings.

Octopus Sapiens
04-23-2013, 07:17 PM
From the MO hab concept I found that hatches between habs are very narrow. Mayby 40-50cm. Peoples will have to crawl to pass from one hab to another. The habs are also not very high. Sealing height looks like no more than 2m. Even more difficult to walk inside the base going to be because Martians will become taller with low gravity.

JJRich
04-24-2013, 12:25 PM
From the MO hab concept I found that hatches between habs are very narrow. Mayby 40-50cm. Peoples will have to crawl to pass from one hab to another. The habs are also not very high. Sealing height looks like no more than 2m. Even more difficult to walk inside the base going to be because Martians will become taller with low gravity.

These are just the artist renderings, next it will need to go to architects, then engineers, then we may get a more accurate rendering, so don't be too harsh on it ;)

hbm11
04-24-2013, 12:46 PM
There are a couple of new concept pictures in this RT article (http://rt.com/news/mars-space-life-search-269/).

BlackCentury
04-24-2013, 01:28 PM
They aren't new. Just look here (http://www.spacehabs.com/424528/mars-one/).
Greets

Areophile
04-24-2013, 01:39 PM
These images are from the MO press pack (http://db.tt/RPgZIn7R)

Mrresistance2012
04-24-2013, 04:02 PM
These images are from the MO press pack (http://db.tt/RPgZIn7R)

In the MO Press Pack "One Way Astronaut" Documentary Trailer starting at 0:58 - 1:58 3:19 - 3:40 in the background the music is from Mass Effect 3 track called Wake Up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQ6BUZEfdZE :) who ever made this trailer must love Mass Effect 3 Soundtrack :cool:

Areophile
04-24-2013, 10:46 PM
I want to see fabrics made and habitats built from local materials. Or at least see the technology in action here on Earth.

rfc
04-25-2013, 08:34 PM
I imagine large domes, made from a row of inflatable plastic foil hose archs. After erecting those hoses just by pumping them up with a small compressor, they are filled with polyurethane foam. Placed close-packed in a row they give a stable building shell. After hardening is complete, the shell is covered with several layers of fiber-reinforced plastic foil, sticked together with more polyurethane foam. Finally the dome is covered with regolith.

Such a dome can easily be as large as a football ground. No big machines (cranes etc.) are required to build it. And all resources you need for making plastics is the local atmosphere (carbon dioxide, water steam and nitrogen) and energy from photovoltaics.

JJRich
04-25-2013, 11:40 PM
I like the dome idea, but making plastics completely out of CO2 is impossible, you need a large amount of reactive organic material like epoxides, to polymerize the CO2. So on Mars this would still not be possible, hopefully in the next 10 years someone solves this polymerization issue, but for now, some sort of concrete seems more likely. It could still be done dome style though!

ps if someone can figure out how to polymerize just CO2, they've essentially cured global warming, and given industry a golden ticket for material production. SO I'm all for it :)

Areophile
04-26-2013, 01:32 AM
Yup, you cannot polymerise CO2, but with the addition of a few other items (N2 from atmosphere, H2 from water, and other bits from regolith) you can make epoxy, polyester and polyethylene. The Mars Homestead Project have done some great work on this. There's a PowerPoint presentation called MHP Polymer production system concept (http://www.marshome.org/files2/MarsHomestead-Polymers.ppt) on their site here (http://www.marshome.org/documents.php) which outlines the whole process. It's an extension of the fuel production process which Dr Zubrin is promoting. This is part of a suite of ideas to allow Martians to build their own airtight habitats, produce their own clothing etc.
So not as easy as putting a Solar Panel, a catalyzer and a bucket outside to catch the plastic, but this approach lends itself to a small-scale industrial plant, which someone could miniaturize for the early years before the Martians can build their own.

Octopus Sapiens
04-26-2013, 04:14 PM
I imagine large domes, made from a row of inflatable plastic foil hose archs. After erecting those hoses just by pumping them up with a small compressor, they are filled with polyurethane foam. Placed close-packed in a row they give a stable building shell. After hardening is complete, the shell is covered with several layers of fiber-reinforced plastic foil, sticked together with more polyurethane foam. Finally the dome is covered with regolith.

Such a dome can easily be as large as a football ground. No big machines (cranes etc.) are required to build it. And all resources you need for making plastics is the local atmosphere (carbon dioxide, water steam and nitrogen) and energy from photovoltaics.

:) I gave similar idea in the neibourg thread. Just some addition info.
Separate archs will need to be sealed one to another tight and strong enough to hold inside pressure. That's technologically difficult process especially on Mars.
It will be hard to build football-size dome of foam and plastic tube. Inside pressure will destroy it. Some additional inbound ropes or strong material (Kevlar-like) layer inside foam to hold pressure. So Kevlar makes it strong and foam - airtight. This technology is for meduim size buildings.
For really big structures, I guess, technology similar to concrete tent can be used. Tarpaulin-like hard material filled with cement and polymers glued from both sides with plastic layers.
Unfold structure. Pumb to high pressure air to keep a shape. Then fill Tarpaulin with water. Not much needed as wall thickness is few mm. When water fill material concrete and plastificators and become hard. Then flush excessive pressure and you have hard air-tight concrete shell. This structure will be heavier than equal size foam filed structure but much stronger and allow to build bigger buildings.

JJRich
05-05-2013, 02:00 AM
Yup, you cannot polymerise CO2, but with the addition of a few other items (N2 from atmosphere, H2 from water, and other bits from regolith) you can make epoxy, polyester and polyethylene. The Mars Homestead Project have done some great work on this. There's a PowerPoint presentation called MHP Polymer production system concept (http://www.marshome.org/files2/MarsHomestead-Polymers.ppt) on their site here (http://www.marshome.org/documents.php) which outlines the whole process. It's an extension of the fuel production process which Dr Zubrin is promoting. This is part of a suite of ideas to allow Martians to build their own airtight habitats, produce their own clothing etc.
So not as easy as putting a Solar Panel, a catalyzer and a bucket outside to catch the plastic, but this approach lends itself to a small-scale industrial plant, which someone could miniaturize for the early years before the Martians can build their own.

Good link Areophile, I haven't seen any proof of concept though in the last 7.5 years. Also, the patent mentioned in the ppt was never granted (from what I can tell by a few patent searches). So although it appears sound chemically, I'm not too sure if all of the leaps they make are realistic.

The other concern is that if it takes too much energy (Zubrin's plans requires a nuclear reactor which MO says they are not planning on), it becomes easier to ship the plastic to Mars, or to just increase crop production and make the plastics out of food. It's going to take tons (literally) of plastic to make the habitats so instead, maybe aerogels could be made out of the regolith and shaped into the dome structures? I know some recent research showed they can now make aerogels at lower temps, so plastic may not be necessary except as a very thin coating. meaning a few kilos, rather than tons, would be necessary.

Areophile
05-05-2013, 02:57 AM
Fair comment, JJRich. I guess this technology is unproven, but I'm hoping that the MO effort will flush out some keen PHD students who will get it to work practically. The biggest ask is to find appropriate catalysts which the Martians can produce themselves, I guess. And sufficient power, as you say.
Last time I looked, aerogels were really hard to make, and not that strong, albeit very strong for their weight. Happy to be proven wrong, as they are seriously cool tech.
Yeah, I hadn't thought of that, but the most efficient way we have of making polymers out of sunlight is plants :) I am also hoping that only a thin foil of plastic will be necessary. Alternatively, maybe a polymer additive to a regolith concrete derivative? A lot of work has been done on polymer additives to cement and such. Maybe we will also find ways to give sunlight to the plants directly, rather than via solar cells, at some point in the future.

JJRich
05-05-2013, 05:39 AM
^^ great comments! I think the polymer additives is a good idea, and could even provide conductive properties to the habs so that energy could be generated during dust storms or similar added benefits.

I was talking about aerogels more for insulation, sorry about the confusion. I imagine they could provide some structural support to, though maybe not enough as you mention. They have gotten much easier to produce in the last year but I will have to dig through some articles to see if I remember correctly. But I know for sure they can now be made 'wet' with water in the mix and at lower temperatures than the traditional 1000C or so.

Somewhat off topic: I think that MO will have to send everything to survive for 2 years with the first crew. Assuming everything fails, they would need supplies to last them to the next drop. So I believe a lot of work will be done by the Universities on figuring out potential tools for in situ material generation (similar to the link you provided) but a massive amount of optimizing will have to take place on Mars itself since we still don't have very accurate analysis of the materials at the intended land site. The rovers have given some general ideas of available materials in the regolith, but there will probably me some useful materials in the rock too, and this will only be fully understood once humans land. This is along the lines of what we see with the ISS where NASA may send a water purification system that should work X hours per day, but ends up only working 0.1X hours at first and has to be tweaked due to unforeseen complications.

I also have to second your comment on PhD students. Dedicated slave labor is the way to go on these sorts of things ;) just kidding kind of